Tuesday, August 28, 2012    |    BIO-IT World    |    Archives    |    Advertising   |    CHI Conferences    |    Subscribe 

THIS WEEK IN BIO-IT WORLD     

Video: Nancy Kelley on the New York Genome Center
Bio-IT World | Video: Nancy Kelley, founding executive director of the New York Genome
Center, speaks on camera with Bio-IT World editor Kevin Davies about the rapid progress
and future plans for the new genome center currently under construction in the SoHo
district of Manhattan. Read More 
 
 
 

 Video: John Boyce Previews the Consumer Genetics Conference
 
CGC | John Boyce, CEO GnuBio and the co-founder of The Consumer Genetics Conference,
discusses the history behind this successful show and previews the highlights of the 2012
program, being held October 3-5 in Boston. Read More 
 
 

ELSEWHERE IN THE NEWS 

From Google to Flatiron Health and the Fight Against Cancer
Business Insider | After selling their start-up, Invite Media, to Google for $81 million, Nat
Turner and Zach Weinberg have founded a new company, Flatiron Health, aimed at devising
ways to help mine clinical data and cure cancer. Read More
   

 

Klebsiella Pneumoniae Superbug Killed Six at NIH Clinical Center
Huffington Post | Scientists are reporting how next-generation sequencing identified a
deadly antibiotic-resistant 'superbug' that spread alarmingly through the medical center at
the NIH, ultimately claiming six lives before the source of infection was confirmed and the
microbe eradicated. Read More
 
 
 

The Unsung Heroes Behind Those Big Genomics Breakthroughs
 The Guardian | A core facility is a slightly unusual niche for a career scientist – not an
independent researcher, not a lecturer, but more like running a small-to-medium sized
biotechnology company that happens to be not-for-profit.
Read More 
    

deCODE Study Finds Older Dads Pass On More Genetic Mutations
 
Wall Street Journal | According to the latest publication from Iceland's deCODE Genetics, a
sequencing study reveals that older fathers pass on more new genetic mutations to their
children than younger fathers, thus increasing their children's risk of autism, schizophrenia
and other diseases. Read More