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Moving Chips to the Clinic - Gene Chips in Action: Breast Cancer



Stephen Friend and colleagues used gene signatures to predict whether breast cancer was likely to recur. They reported that their method was more accurate than conventional tests. Below: Gene expression levels from 70 marker genes were measured and used to predict the patient's prognosis. Each row represents a tumor, and each column a gene, whose name is labeled at the bottom. Red indicates overexpression compared to control, green signifies reduced expression (see scale at left). Genes are ordered according to how strongly they predict one or the other outcome. Tumors are ordered by how closely their gene expression profile fits with the average
Stephen Friend and colleagues used gene signatures to predict whether breast cancer was likely to recur. They reported that their method was more accurate than conventional tests. Below: Gene expression levels from 70 marker genes were measured and used to predict the patient's prognosis. Each row represents a tumor, and each column a gene, whose name is labeled at the bottom. Red indicates overexpression compared to control, green signifies reduced expression (see scale at left). Genes are ordered according to how strongly they predict one or the other outcome. Tumors are ordered by how closely their gene expression profile fits with the average


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